An influencer has sparked controversy by showing off a cup of atole for 70 pesos in Oaxaca

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Locals denounce that they have been displaced by entrepreneurs seeking to benefit from the gentrification of Oaxaca.

Amid complaints about displacement caused by gentrification in Oaxaca, an influencer has unleashed controversy by sharing a video in which he expresses his surprise at acquiring a cup of atole for 70 pesos, a price considerably higher than that offered by local vendors.

The video, posted by influencer Fer Solis on his TikTok account, shows his enthusiasm for acquiring a cup of atole for a price of 70 pesos at an establishment in Oaxaca. This has drawn criticism from users, who point out that local vendors offer the same product at a much lower price, usually below 30 pesos.

Gentrification in Oaxaca displaces small merchants Gentrification in Oaxaca has been a social and economic phenomenon that has profoundly affected the community and local merchants. This process, characterized by rising housing prices and the arrival of new residents with higher purchasing power, has caused displacements and significant changes in the social and economic fabric of the city.

One of the most evident effects of gentrification has been the increase in housing and rental prices, forcing many low-income residents to move to areas further away from the city center. This has led to social problems such as segregation and exclusion.

Moreover, gentrification has impacted the labor market and local economy, with the proliferation of precarious and poorly paid jobs in the tourism sector. It has also led to the loss of cultural identity and the homogenization of urban space, with the disappearance of small businesses and traditional services.

The influencer’s post has sparked intense debate on social networks, with some users arguing in favor of high prices as an opportunity to promote local gastronomy and improve food service in tourist spots, while others criticize the exploitation of visitors and the negative impact on local merchants.

Source: Excelsior