Mexico has given the Green Iguana many names

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The green iguana (Iguana iguana) is a large lizard that can grow up to 2.2 meters long and weigh up to 15 kilograms. It has a wide range of colors, from bright green to gray-blue, depending on its age, mood, temperature, and health. It also has a crest of spiny scales along its back and a long tail that it can use as a whip to defend itself. It can even detach its tail if caught by a predator and regrow it later.

The green iguana is native to the rainforests of northern Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean Islands, and southern Brazil. It prefers to live near water sources, such as rivers, lakes, and mangroves. It is an excellent swimmer and climber, spending most of its time in the canopy of trees. It is a diurnal animal, meaning it is active during the day and sleeps at night.

The green iguana is an herbivore, feeding mainly on leaves, flowers, and fruits. It has strong jaws with razor-sharp teeth that can cut through tough plant material. It also has a special organ in its mouth that helps it digest plant matter. The green iguana can live up to 20 years in the wild.

The green iguana has many names in different languages and cultures. In Spanish, it is called iguana verde or simply iguana. In Nahuatl, the language of the Aztecs, it is called Cuetzpallin or “feathered lizard”. In Maya, it is called Hulub or “big lizard”. In some Caribbean islands, it is known as bamboo chicken or tree chicken because of its meat.

The green iguana is a popular pet in many countries, but it requires special care and attention. It needs a large enclosure with proper lighting, heating, humidity, and ventilation. It also needs a varied diet of fresh vegetables and fruits, supplemented with calcium and vitamins. Many pet iguanas die within the first year due to improper care or neglect.

The green iguana is also threatened by habitat loss, hunting, and illegal trade. It is listed as a species subject to special protection in Mexico and as an appendix II species in CITES, which means that its trade must be regulated to prevent overexploitation. The green iguana is an important part of the ecosystem and the culture of its native regions, and it deserves our respect and conservation.


The green iguana is also threatened by habitat loss, hunting, and illegal trade. It is listed as a species subject to special protection in Mexico and as an appendix II species in CITES1, which means that its trade must be regulated to prevent overexploitation. The green iguana is an important part of the ecosystem and the culture of its native regions, and it deserves our respect and conservation.2345